Mon04272015

Last updateThu, 23 Apr 2015 9pm

LOS ANGELES Monday, April 27th 2015 12:06

  • Issue: Bathing topless at Venice Beach

    Martha Groves

    Date: Apr 24, 2015

    Forty years ago, a cadre of Venice Beach sunbathers routinely basked in the altogether. 

    The Venice Neighborhood Council thinks the time is ripe to take a half-step back to that time of physical freedom. In a 12-2 vote Tuesday, the council said it "supports women being afforded the same rights as men to sunbathe topless." 

    There are so many more important things to be concerned about in Venice...this makes us look foolish. 

    The city and county of Los Angeles prohibit nude or topless sunbathing. But Melissa Diner, the Venice council community officer who sponsored the resolution, said the panel would draft letters to Councilman Mike Bonin, Mayor Eric Garcetti and the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, which has jurisdiction over the beach, calling for Venice to be exempted.  (Read the rest.)  


Thu Apr 30, 2015 @11:30AM -
Town Hall: Raising the Minimum Wage
Fri May 01, 2015 @11:00AM - 02:00PM
Women for a New Los Angeles Luncheon
Fri May 01, 2015 @12:00PM - 05:00PM
Women for a New Los Angeles
Fri May 08, 2015 @ 8:00AM - 08:00PM
Greenlining Institute 22nd Annual Economic Summit in L.A. May 8
Wed May 13, 2015 @11:30AM -
Reflections on Leadership in the Museum World from an Outsider


Dr Oz digs in. I will not be silenced!

Puppy high for the day: Puppy battles doorstopper

 

 

 

 

  

 

 


Passing the Buck

The Buck Stops Here

Most men in the early west carried a jack knife made by the Buck Knife Company.  When playing poker, it was common to place one of these Buck Knives in front of the dealer so that everyone knew who he was.  When it was time for a new dealer, the deck of cards and the knife were given to the new dealer.  If this person didn't want to deal, he would "Pass the Buck" to the next player.  If that player accepted, then "the Buck stops here".

 


 

 

Enabler In Chief

DEBATE TALK - Wednesday night, Mitt Romney talked about what he wanted to talk about and Barack Obama talked about what Mitt Romney wanted to talk about. No wonder liberals are depressed today.

It is true, as Salon’s Alex Pareene says, that Jim Lehrer asked questions that suggested “domestic policy” is an arid and narrow space where deficit reduction and maybe one or two other things trump almost anything else. But why did Barack Obama cede that ground to both Lehrer and Romney, with barely a desultory defense of what he stands for?

Both campaigns had essentially been appealing to their bases — Romney because he was pinned down by the Republican primaries and subject to ongoing purity tests, Obama because hope and change don’t really work for an incumbent and because Republican obstructionism and extremism left few other options.

If liberals spent much of Obama’s first term griping that he was bringing a knife to a gun fight, they were energized by a campaign that wasn’t afraid to attack Mitt Romney at the same time that it made an affirmative case for basic liberal values, at the convention and elsewhere.

And, crucially, they were galvanized by spotlights on just how radical elected Republicans are these days, from Paul Ryan making Ayn Randian cruelty mainstream to Todd Akin bringing the crudest anti-abortion talking points out of the bottom drawer. (The rest of Irin Carmon’s take on The Debate here.)
-cw



CityWatch
Vol 10 Issue 80
Pub: Oct 5, 2012

 

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