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Last updateThu, 23 Apr 2015 9pm

LOS ANGELES Sunday, April 26th 2015 8:41

  • Issue: Bathing topless at Venice Beach

    Martha Groves

    Date: Apr 24, 2015

    Forty years ago, a cadre of Venice Beach sunbathers routinely basked in the altogether. 

    The Venice Neighborhood Council thinks the time is ripe to take a half-step back to that time of physical freedom. In a 12-2 vote Tuesday, the council said it "supports women being afforded the same rights as men to sunbathe topless." 

    There are so many more important things to be concerned about in Venice...this makes us look foolish. 

    The city and county of Los Angeles prohibit nude or topless sunbathing. But Melissa Diner, the Venice council community officer who sponsored the resolution, said the panel would draft letters to Councilman Mike Bonin, Mayor Eric Garcetti and the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, which has jurisdiction over the beach, calling for Venice to be exempted.  (Read the rest.)  


Thu Apr 30, 2015 @11:30AM -
Town Hall: Raising the Minimum Wage
Fri May 01, 2015 @11:00AM - 02:00PM
Women for a New Los Angeles Luncheon
Fri May 01, 2015 @12:00PM - 05:00PM
Women for a New Los Angeles
Fri May 08, 2015 @ 8:00AM - 08:00PM
Greenlining Institute 22nd Annual Economic Summit in L.A. May 8
Wed May 13, 2015 @11:30AM -
Reflections on Leadership in the Museum World from an Outsider


Dr Oz digs in. I will not be silenced!

Puppy high for the day: Puppy battles doorstopper

 

 

 

 

  

 

 


Passing the Buck

The Buck Stops Here

Most men in the early west carried a jack knife made by the Buck Knife Company.  When playing poker, it was common to place one of these Buck Knives in front of the dealer so that everyone knew who he was.  When it was time for a new dealer, the deck of cards and the knife were given to the new dealer.  If this person didn't want to deal, he would "Pass the Buck" to the next player.  If that player accepted, then "the Buck stops here".

 


 

 

Occupy LA: Time to Get Off the Lawn

RETHINKING LA - The Occupy LA movement has divided the community into two groups, those who support the movement and those who are opposed, and then it has done the impossible, it has created an opportunity for the two sides to come together.

Those who oppose the Occupy LA movement’s occupation of LA’s City Hall Park charge that the leaderless disorganization of the opt-in crowd lacks a refined and cohesive message and is therefore an exercise in noise and obstruction.
Those who support Occupy LA contend that their complaints are valid and that the long litany of issues that have been raised are not only accurate, they represent a critical call for action that demonstrates the need to raise up real leadership.

The two positions aren’t necessarily exclusive, in fact, there may be more common ground than either side has recognized.

If the opponents of Occupy LA really want to see the tents disappear from City Hall Park, the simplest solution would be to step up and demonstrate the leadership necessary to tackle the big issues, to ask the tough questions, and to take meaningful action.

If the supporters of Occupy LA really want see this movement actually move, the most effective tactic would be to step up and provide the leadership necessary to take the action inside, to the Mayor’s office and to City Council, where the decisions are made.

The ongoing debate over the lack of leadership and coherent message from Occupy LA has allowed the Mayor and City Council to quietly continue to debate barking dogs and parking tickets while avoiding the tough issues that are the substance of the debate on the street.

The Mayor and the City Council have a vested interest in this debate continuing because once it ends, the focus will shift and they’ll be left to answer for their failing performance over the last several years.

As Occupy LA rails against Wall Street, LA’s investment portfolio shriveled, yet City Hall has shrugged it off as inevitable and allowed the people of LA to make up the difference at the expense of our infrastructure and the delivery of critical city services.

As Occupy LA charges banks with their role in a collapsing economy, the City of LA experiences unprecedented home foreclosures that destroy families, blight neighborhoods, and reduce property tax income to a city already in a budget crisis.

As Occupy LA calls for leadership that will deliver economic justice to the quickly disappearing middle class, the City of LA experiences unemployment that exceeds the national rate by 40% and homelessness that is three times the national rate.

The supporters of Occupy LA want to see the movement move forward and they want to see the issues addressed in a meaningful and effective manner.

The opponents of Occupy LA want to see the occupation of City Hall Park come to an end and they want to see real leadership take on the issues with a coherent message.

Fair enough.

It’s time to take the baton from those who have effectively brought the conversation to the marketplace of ideas and now it’s time for the supporters and the opponents to put up, to step up, to demonstrate the leadership that is missing, and to take the movement inside City Hall.

It’s time that we stop looking to the tents at City Hall Park and instead look inside City Hall and ask the Mayor and the City Council the tough questions, “Where is the leadership and what is the plan?”

(Stephen Box is a grassroots advocate and writes for CityWatch. He can be reached at:   Stephen@thirdeyecreative.net .) –cw

Tags: Occupy LA, City Hall, City Hall lawn, Wall Street





CityWatch
Vol 9 Issue 92
Pub: Nov 18, 2011

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