What Happens if America Loses Its Unions

LABOR - Are American unions history?

In the wake of labor’s defeated effort to recall Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker (R) last week, both pro- and anti-union pundits have opined that unions are in an all-but-irreversible decline. Privately, a number of my friends and acquaintances in the labor movement have voiced similar sentiments. Most don’t think that decline is irreversible but few have any idea how labor would come back.


What would America look like without a union movement? That’s not a hard question to answer, because we’re almost at that point. The rate of private-sector unionization has fallen below 7 percent, from a post-World War II high of roughly 40 percent. Already, the economic effects of a union-free America are glaringly apparent: an economically stagnant or downwardly mobile middle class, a steady clawing-back of job-related health and retirement benefits and ever-rising economic inequality. (The rest of Harold Meyerson’s Washington Post piece here.)

(Harold Meyerson writes a political and domestic affairs column for the Washington Post.)


Tags: Harold Meyerson, labor, unions





CityWatch
Vol 10 Issue 48
Pub: June 15, 2012